The Religion of Americanism

16:52, 27 iunie 2018 | Actual | 419 vizualizări | Nu există niciun comentariu | Autor:

We have written of magick as one possible religious path that folks in the several States might walk in the future.  Another possibility is not a new religion but merely the strengthening of an already existing one:  the cult of Americanism.

Jay Dyer describes it this way:

American churchianity, and the West in general, are a giant atheism factory.  . . .  The rot of these institutions has many sources, the more theological of which, I outlined in my video on the Decline of the West.

As I’ve mentioned, the mass promotion of atheism lacks the power of any real hold on man’s heart because man is a god-worshipping being.   For the classical American Protestant, for example, the Constitution becomes the new inspired text, the “founding fathers” become the new church fathers, America becomes the new “city on a hill” slash mystical body of Christ, and the “invisible hand” of the free market is the new divine providence.  . . .

Source:  https://souloftheeast.org/2017/06/11/cia-ecumenism-religious-liberty-are-the-statist-sex-cult-of-jeroboam/

One could add to this.  The Constitutional Convention of 1787 is an Ecumenical Council.  Election campaign season, with its great physical and spiritual exertions, is Great Lent.  Presidential Election Day is Holy Pascha/Easter.  The regular working of the legislature, courts, etc. is the Divine Liturgy, where grace is mediated to the patriotic faithfulthrough the sacraments of ‘constitutional’ laws, rulings, and so forth (unconstitutional = heretical, without grace).  Etc.

In other words, because Protestantism (ironically) puts God at such a distance from man, in the [u]nited States he has created a new god closer to him, the Messianic American nation, to worship and adore.  In thisnew religion, salvation lies in the perfect working of the American political system and in participating in that political life.

David Brooks declares this rather plainly:

. . . What on earth holds this nation together? The answer can be only this: Despite our differences, we devote our lives to the same experiment, the American experiment to draw people from around the world and to create the best society ever, to serve as a model for all humankind.

Unity can come only from a common dedication to this experiment. The American consciousness can be formed only by the lab reports we give one another about that experiment — the jeremiads, speeches, songs and conversations that describe what the experiment is for, where it has failed and how it should proceed now.

One of my favorites of these lab reports is Walt Whitman’s essay “Democratic Vistas,” published in 1871. The purpose of democracy, Whitman wrote, is not wealth, or even equality; it is the full flowering of individuals. By dispersing responsibility to all adults, democracy “supplies a training school for making first class men.” It is “life’s gymnasium.” It forges “freedom’s athletes” — strong and equal women, courageous men, deep-souled people capable of governing themselves.

One of my favorites of these lab reports is Walt Whitman’s essay “Democratic Vistas,” published in 1871. The purpose of democracy, Whitman wrote, is not wealth, or even equality; it is the full flowering of individuals. By dispersing responsibility to all adults, democracy “supplies a training school for making first class men.” It is “life’s gymnasium.” It forges “freedom’s athletes” — strong and equal women, courageous men, deep-souled people capable of governing themselves.

Whitman had hoped that the end of the Civil War and Lincoln’s sacrificial death would bring the nation together. But instead there was corruption, division, demoralization and inequality.  . . .

America has created a brilliant political constitution, Whitman wrote. It has amassed untold wealth. But it has not created a democratic culture that captures, celebrates and ennobles the way average Americans live day to day.

. . .  When there is no common sense of mystical purpose, you end up with alienation, division, distrust, “universal ennui,” a loss of faith in the American project.  . . .

Whitman was not, however, pessimistic. He had worked as a nurse during the Civil War, watching men recover and die, and the experience had given him illimitable faith in the goodness of average citizens. Average American soldiers showed more fortitude, religious devotion and grandeur than all the storybook heroes, he wrote. They died not for glory, nor even to repel invasion, but out of gratitude to have been included in the American experiment. They died “for an emblem, a mere abstraction — for the life, the safety of the flag.”

Whitman spent his life trying to spiritualize democratic life and reshape the American imagination, to help working people see the epic heroism all around them that unites the American spirit.

. . .

So much of what he wrote rings true today: the need to see democratic life as an exhilarating adventure, the terrible damage done when you tell groups that they are of no account, the need for a unifying American mythos, the power of culture to provide that mythos and, above all, the reminder that this is still early days. We’re still a young country. The times may be discouraging, but the full strength of American democracy is still waiting to be born.

Source:  https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/opinion/what-holds-america-together.html?rref=collection%2Fissuecollection%2Ftodays-new-york-times

The key theme here is perfection of the individual and the collective through the democratic/constitutional process.  This is a self-contained process, a closedcycle of deification where the Christian God is not needed (although He is useful for propaganda purposes), which brings us back to the place we thought had been left behind:  occult magick.  For it resembles very much the workingout of the ouroboros symbolism in alchemy:

The alchemists, who in their own way knew more about the nature of the individuation process than we moderns do, expressed this paradox through the symbol of the Ouroboros, the snake that eats its own tail. The Ouroboros has been said to have a meaning of infinity or wholeness. In the age-old image of the Ouroboros lies the thought of devouring oneself and turning oneself into a circulatory process, for it was clear to the more astute alchemists that the prima materia of the art was man himself. The Ouroboros is a dramatic symbol for the integration and assimilation of the opposite, i.e. of the shadow. This ‘feed-back’ process is at the same time a symbol of immortality, since it is said of the Ouroboros that he slays himself and brings himself to life, fertilizes himself and gives birth to himself. He symbolizes the One, who proceeds from the clash of opposites [Republicans vs Democrats, conservatives vs liberals, right vs left, local vs national, public vs private, individual vs collective, etc.–W.G.], and he therefore constitutes the secret of the prima materia which … unquestionably stems from man’s unconscious.

Source:  Carl Jung, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouroboros#Jungian_psychology

It is fitting, then, that the first flag of the u. S., the Betsy Ross flag, has a representation not of the Holy Cross of Christ, nor any other Christian symbol, but a likeness of the ouroboros:

photo: http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagfact.html
photo: http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagfact.html
photo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouroboros
photo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouroboros

Are there Christian elements in U. S. history?  Certainly.  And they have led tomany good works:  acts of charity, Bible printing, etc.  These outward works, however, cannot cover over the truth that there is something dark and disturbing at the heart of the‘American experiment’.

Author: Walt Garlington
Source: usareally.com

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